Sanctions

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

News

On 7 March 2013 the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2094 (2013) to impose additional sanctions on North Korea in response to that country’s 12 February 2013 nuclear test. The resolution builds upon, strengthens and significantly expands the scope of the strong sanctions regime already in place. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is currently preparing amendments to the Charter of the United Nations (Sanctions – Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) Regulations 2008.

On 14 October 2006 the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) adopted resolution 1718 (2006) imposing sanctions in relation to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea in response to a test of a nuclear weapon on 9 October 2006, which it deemed a threat to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and to international efforts aimed at strengthening the global regime of non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and a danger to peace and stability in the region and beyond. The sanctions were renewed and extended by UNSC resolution 1874 (2009) and resolution 2087 (2013).

Australia remains concerned about the nature of DPRK’s nuclear program.

Australia fully implements its obligations under UNSC resolutions in relation to DPRK, including 1718 (2006), 1874 (2009) and 2087 (2012).  In addition to UNSC sanctions, Australia maintains its own autonomous sanctions in relation to DPRK. 

For more information on the specific sanctions:

Where relevant, we have provided an indication of the Australian law implementing the specific sanction. In all cases, please refer to both the Charter of the United Nations Act 1945,the Autonomous Sanctions Act 2011, the Charter of the United Nations (Sanctions – Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) Regulations 2008 and the Autonomous Sanctions Regulations 2011.  Please also consult the Consolidated List.

Exporting arms, nuclear material, ballistic missile technology

Sanctions pursuant to UN Security Council (UNSC) resolutions

Australian law prohibits:

  • the unauthorised supply, sale or transfer of all arms and related materiel, including financial transactions, technical training, advice, services or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of all arm and related materiel:

Australian law also prohibits the unauthorised supply, sale or transfer of goods proscribed by UNSC resolutions, including:

Australian law also prohibits:

Importing arms, nuclear material, ballistic missile technology

Sanctions pursuant to UNSC resolutions

Australian law prohibits the procurement and financial transactions, technical training, advice, services or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of from the DPRK of:

  • all arms and related materiel.

Australia law also prohibits the procurement, and technical training, advice, services or assistance related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance or use of:

Transport sector

Sanctions pursuant to UNSC resolutions

Australian law prohibits the unauthorised provision of bunkering services, such as the provision of fuel or supplies or other servicing, to a DPRK vessel.

Australian law also prohibits the provision of services relating to the transportation of:

Implementing legislation

Autonomous sanctions

The entry into a port or place in Australia by a DPRK flagged vessel.

Implementing legislation

Targeted financial sanctions and travel bans

Sanctions pursuant to UNSC resolutions

The use or dealing with the assets of, and the making available of assets to, persons and entities listed by the Security Council or by the 1718 Committee.

The entry or transit through Australia of persons listed by the Security Council or the Sanctions Committee

Implementing legislation:

Autonomous sanctions

The use or dealing with the assets of, and the making available of assets to, a person or entity designated by the Minister for Foreign Affairs other than as authorised by a permit issued by the Minister for Foreign Affairs.

The entry or transit through Australia of DPRK nationals

Implementing legislation:

De-listing requests

Listed individuals and entities can submit de-listing requests either through the focal point process outlined in UNSC resolution 1730 (2006) or through their State of residence or citizenship.

Further information can be found at the webpage for the Focal Point for De-listing.

More information