168 Department of External Affairs to Hodgson

CANBERRA, 4 April 1946 Cablegram 533

MOST IMMEDIATE SECRET

UNY.21.

1. Confirming conversation with Hasluck. If Byrnes introduces motion [1], you should make a statement along lines indicated below. You should not move an amendment, but having made our objections clear, abstain from voting.

2. In your statement you should enunciate the principles contained in our original directive [2], particularly the Australian policy of having an investigation, and your whole statement should lead up to clear notification that at the meeting of 6th May Australia proposes complete investigation of the whole situation. You should emphasise that the withdrawal of troops is only one aspect of the general dispute and, the matter having been referred to the Security Council, Council should itself investigate or appoint a committee to conduct an investigation into all aspects of the dispute.

3. The statement should clearly indicate that we regard the Soviet treatment of the Security Council in refusing to attend its meetings as unwarranted and a slight to the Security Council. You should also refer to Persian vacillation in relation to invoking the jurisdiction of the Security Council. You should point out that Byrnes' resolution is inadequate, first, because it limits consideration to withdrawal of troops which is only one aspect of the matter and, second, because it is calculated to prevent full investigation being taken subsequently. Furthermore, your statement should emphasise that apart from withdrawal of troops there have been many surrounding circumstances which call for close and careful investigation.

4. In summary, you should enunciate the principles in the first instruction, emphasising the judicial nature of the Security Council and the importance of a fact-finding investigation now that the matter has been referred to the Security Council. There should be strong criticism of the Soviet action in walking out of the Council and also of Persian vacillation. A thorough investigation of all the facts is essential to the future prestige and fearless exercise of jurisdiction by the Security Council. [3]

1 See Document 166.

2 See Documents 39 and 57.

3 Cablegrams United Nations 37 and United Nations 45, dispatched 4 April and 8 April respectively, reported the success of Byrnes's proposal and Australia's abstention from voting on the grounds that 'the Council did not insist on a complete investigation and examination of all the facts before reaching the decision'.

[AA:A1838 T189, 854/10/2, i]