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Australian Government - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Advancing the interests of Australia and Australians internationally

Australian Government - Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Advancing the interests of Australia and Australians internationally

Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office

Annual Report 2000-2001

ANNEXES

Annex A—Nuclear Material within Australia

Table 6—Nuclear Material within Australia at 30 June 2001

Category

Quantity[1]         

Intended End-use

Source Material:

Uranium ore concentrates (UOC)

  1,057 tonnes U3O8

Exports for energy use pursuant to bilateral agreements

Natural Uranium
(other than UOC)

10,480   kg

Research and shielding

Depleted Uranium

12,085   kg

Research and shielding

Thorium

62,517   kg

Research, industry

Special Fissionable Material

 

 

Uranium-235

168,433 g[2]

Research, industry, radioisotope production

Uranium-233

          4 g

Research

Plutonium (except Pu-238)[3]

   2,033 g[4]

Research, neutron sources

 

[1].      These figures are based on reports received pursuant to Permit requirements and were correct at the time of preparing this Annual Report.

[2].      Most of the uranium-235 in Australia is contained in irradiated fuel elements which have been used in ANSTO’s HIFAR reactor.  The figure given here is based on the weight of U-235 in each fuel element before irradiation, in accordance with the accounting convention used in the application of IAEA safeguards to HIFAR and Moata fuel prior to shipment from ANSTO

[3].      Plutonium with an isotopic concentration of plutonium-238 exceeding 80% is exempt from safeguards.

[4].      Because of the IAEA accounting convention mentioned above, this figure does not include any plutonium in irradiated reactor fuel.  However this quantity is very small and in the event of reprocessing of the fuel, the contained plutonium is considered practicably irrecoverable.

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